Checking out SourceForge’s Marketplace

I’ve registered myself as a seller of services on SourceForge’s Open Source Marketplace. I’ve done so offering software development services for the Snort, Snort_inline and Vuurmuur projects. I was wondering if anyone has any experience (good or bad) with the Marketplace system, either as a buyer or seller of services. Let me know!

Available for contract work

This year there will be a lot of work that needs to be done for the Open Infosec Foundation. And like I wrote a few days ago, a lot of work is already being done. However, most of it is unpaid at this time as it will be some months before our funding comes in. So at least until then I’m available and looking for contract work.

For the last two years I’ve been doing work as a contractor in the (open source) security field. My experience is mostly in coding in C and Perl, primarily on Snort and Snort_inline. Recently I created the (Perl language) SidReporter program for Emerging Threats. Areas I worked in: IPv6 IDS/IPS coding, signature writing, Web Application Firewalls, threading, bandwidth accounting, and more…

Checkout my LinkedIn profile for more info. My resume is available on request.

If you have some work or know someone that does, please let me know!

Snort_inline load balancing

Dave Remien of NitroSecurity created a patch that “implements a relatively simple form of (IPV4) load balancing” between multiple Snort_inline processes using Nfqueue. Here is what it does:

1. Load balancing. The bottom half of the source and dest addresses are added together, and mod’d with the number of “load-balancing” snorts you desire to run. This means that traffic stays with a particular snort, so that state is maintained.

2. Because you can run many snorts (presumably on many CPUs), you can now take advantage of that super-hooty 16way box and those 10 gig NICs you just got your hands on…

3. The snort at the “magicqueue” is a back-up snort – normally no traffic is sent to it, but in the event that one of the “load-balancing” snorts isn’t present, the traffic for that “load-balancing” snort gets sent to the “backup” snort.

And even more, read that here.

I haven’t tried this myself, but it sure looks cool. Try it by checking out the latest SVN code for Snort_inline. Then follow the instructions from README.NFQUEUE.

Big thanks to Dave Remien & NitroSecurity for this contribution!

Snort_inline updated to 2.8.2.1 in SVN

This morning I updated our Snort_inline codebase with SourceFire’s just released 2.8.2.1 version. See the original changelogs here: 2.8.1, 2.8.2, 2.8.2.1.

Also Richard Bejtlich and Nr have good posts about the improvements of the last versions. See Richards post about a fixed frag3 vulnerability here and see Nr’s post here.

Please note that our SVN code has seen limited testing so far, so be careful! Please report any issues!

Snort_inline 2.8.2.rc1 in SVN

Today I’ve spent some time on updating the Snort_inline source to the latest 2.8.2.rc1. The updating went quite smooth, so I hope no big issues pop up. Like before, trying out this code can be done by checking out SVN like this:

svn co https://snort-inline.svn.sourceforge.net/svnroot/snort-inline/trunk

This will save the source to the directory ‘trunk’. In the directory ‘trunk’, run ‘sh autojunk.sh’ and then configure, make, make install…

Snort_inline 2.8 status

A while ago I wrote about porting Snort_inline to 2.8.0.1. That worked well, however we are still trying to resolve some issues. Especially in stickydrop, that is just broken right now. Also, SourceFire released 2.8.0.2 last week, so we need to update to that too.

First however, I will be traveling to California this week. I will be meeting Will there, so I’ll try to get him to fix that damn code ;-)