Compiling Snort_inline with NFQUEUE support on Ubuntu

I needed to setup the right libraries for Snort_inline development on my fresh Ubuntu Feisty installation, so I decided to write down the procedure for those who think compiling Snort_inline from source is hard. 🙂

Make sure you have build-essential package installed. This makes sure you have a compiler and development packages for glibc and other important libraries. I’m installing the libraries from source to get the latest versions because the latest versions are more stable and perform better than the versions included in Feisty. I’m installing them into /usr because some programs like them there best.

Download the library libnfnetlink version 0.0.25 from http://ftp.netfilter.org/pub/libnfnetlink/

$ tar xvfj libnfnetlink-0.0.25.tar.bz2
$ cd libnfnetlink-0.0.25/
$ ./configure --prefix=/usr
$ make
$ sudo make install

Next download libnetfilter_queue version 0.0.13 from http://ftp.netfilter.org/pub/libnetfilter_queue/

$ tar xvfj libnetfilter_queue-0.0.13.tar.bz2
$ cd libnetfilter_queue-0.0.13
$ ./configure --prefix=/usr
$ make
$ sudo make install

Okay, that sets up the Netfilter libraries.

Next is the installation of libdnet. Do not use the dnet packages from Debian and Ubuntu because this is not the same library as we need for Snort_inline.

Download libdnet 1.11 from http://libdnet.sourceforge.net/

$ tar xzvf libdnet-1.11.tar.gz
$ cd libdnet-1.11
$ ./configure --prefix=/usr
$ make
$ sudo make install

Download snort_inline 2.6.1.5 from http://snort-inline.sourceforge.net/

$ tar xvzf snort_inline-2.6.1.5.tar.gz
$ cd snort_inline-2.6.1.5
$ ./configure --enable-nfnetlink
$ make
$ sudo make install

Test if it works (as root):

# iptables -A OUTPUT -p icmp -j NFQUEUE
# iptables -A INPUT -p icmp -j NFQUEUE
# /usr/local/bin/snort_inline -v -Q -H0

Then ping some host and you should see Snort_inline display the packets. If it doesn’t work, it might be that the kernel modules needed for nfqueue are not yet loaded. Using ‘lsmod’ check if ‘nfnetlink’ and ‘nfnetlink_queue’ are loaded. If not, load them manually.

After this, setup Snort_inline as normal.

Debian should update their Snort package

Last week there was some discussion in the #snort IRC channel about why Debian distributes such an ancient version of Snort, namely version 2.3.3. This release is more than 2 years old and no longer supported by SourceFire. The snort.org website says about the old versions:

You should not use these unless you really know what you are doing. Many bugs may have been fixed, including remote vulnerabilities

Even though Debian is able to fix any security bugs themselves, and they don’t need to rely on SourceFire for this, Snort 2.3.3 is still going to be inferior to the recent 2.6.1.5. Why? Well recent Snort versions have many more and improved detection options, such as a better pattern matcher, defragmentation preprocessor, improved stream preprocessor, smtp plugin, etc, etc.

So why is Debian not updating Snort? The answer can be found in the Debian bugtracker. Snort is released under the GPL and up to and including version 2.3.3 included a ruleset. But since then only Snort itself is distributed under the GPL, the (VRT) rules are now under a less free license. Of course the user can get them for free, but with a 30 day delay and only after registering with SourceFire. Big deal, I would say, just remove the rules from the package and put some doc describing how to get rules. But the Debian maintainer doesn’t like this idea:

“Consequently, upgrading to 2.4 would mean providing just an IDS engine, not an IDS “service”.” (source)

I think this reasoning makes no sense, for a number of reasons:

  1. Snort can be useful even without any rules: it can detect anomalies in stream tracking, dns, ftp, http, smtp. It can provide statistics, capture traffic.
  2. Managing the Snort rules through the very static Debian packages system make no sense in the first place. Many of the rules change weekly or even daily. Debian would never update the package for this. Oinkmaster should be used for this, and Debian provides this tool as well.
  3. People can write their own rules.
  4. There still are many free rules available. The Snort community rules are GPL licensed, Bleeding rules are BSD licensed. Together they have thousands of rules.

So Debian, please make your Snort package usable again, and update it to the latest stable version! And while you are at it, provide an inline enabled package as well 😉

Sguil 0.7 CVS installation on Debian Etch

Sguil 0.7 is getting shape quite nicely. One of the most interesting new features is the splitting up of different types of agents and the option to create ‘net groups’. This are groups of agents that Sguil considers part of the same network. You can use this to spread the agents over multiple servers, but still use it from Sguil as if it was one single sensor. For example, this way you can easily create a Snort sensor and a separate full content logging capture server. When you request the full content for a Snort event in Sguil, it will know that it needs to request the packet data from the capture server. This way you can also have multiple Snort agents without the need for capturing the same sancp and full content data over and over again.

David Bianco has written a very nice guide for installing Sguil 0.7 on Redhat Enterprise 4. I used this guide to install the server and sensor on a Debian Etch installation. The main difference is that I used Debian packages where ever possible. These packages could be used:

mysql-server
p0f
tcpflow
tcllib
mysqltcl
tcltls
tcl8.3
tclx8.3

Important: do not use the tcl8.4 package. It is not compatible with Sguil and will produce the following message:

ERROR: This version of tcl was compile with threading enabled. Sguil is NOT compatible with threading.
SGUILD: Exiting…

You can get Sguil 0.7 CVS by checking out the latest CVS version:

cvs -d:pserver:anonymous@sguil.cvs.sourceforge.net:/cvsroot/sguil login
cvs -d:pserver:anonymous@sguil.cvs.sourceforge.net:/cvsroot/sguil co sguil

I will update Modsec2sguil soon!